Are you ready to create the impossible?

Congrats on taking the first step to achieving amazing results in your life. Now that you’re here, we want to help you create the impossible in 2021. This class is the key to taking control of your results so you can accomplish anything you want.

We brought in four Certified Coaches who are experts in making the impossible happen. These coaches are sharing what they did to create life-changing results in their own lives. They’ll teach you how to set impossible goals for yourself and what you need to do to take action toward them.

Each of these coaches applied exactly what they’re teaching in this class to do impossible things like learning to walk again, increasing their income by 5x, and building their dream career.

When you watch this class, you’ll learn how to continually move forward so you don’t freeze up while working toward your impossible goal. If you apply what these coaches teach, you’ll be amazed at the results you see.

Watch the video below to learn exactly how to create the impossible in 2021.

Jenn Hatch:

Welcome, we are so glad that you're all joining us. I'm going to go ahead and change my name, so that you guys know who I am. And as everybody is coming in, I just wanted to introduce the call, this is our Creating the Impossible call. And all of us on this call, all of us coaches, have created the impossible in our own life, and we're so excited to share with you guys some of our favorite tools that have helped us do that. So, this call is going to work for us, we're all going to introduce ourselves, we're going to share a little bit of our backstory, where we were at before we found Scholars and where we've come. And some of you might be able to relate to some of the things that we're going to share.

Jenn Hatch:

And then, we're all going to take a moment to teach a tool that helped us get our impossible goal. And then, at the end of the call, you'll want to stay on because we'll open it up to Q&A, and you guys will be able to ask questions in the Q&A box, and then we will answer them. So, make sure you stay on to the end, and we'll get through as many questions as we can. So, I'm going to start out by introducing myself, I am Jenn Hatch, I am the director of Self Coaching Scholars, and I'm also an instructor in the Coach Certification Program.

Jenn Hatch:

When I joined The Life Coach School, my initial impossible goal really was just to feel better. I was struggling in my relationships with other people, especially my spouse, and I was struggling in my relationship with myself, so my impossible goal was to stop being the victim in my life and really start being a hero, and it really did feel impossible. And a few months in, doing this work and really diving in, I achieved that impossible goal of really becoming the hero, and I thought I would be done there. But then, there was this little voice inside me that was telling me I was ready for more growth. So, some of you might be in that space of that little voice saying that there's more growth for you in this next year, and that's why you might be on this call.

Jenn Hatch:

And I want to share with you that I knew that I was ready for growth, but I was also very afraid of it. And so, when I set my impossible goal, I set it to be a financial goal, because I knew that would grow me the most. It would stretch me the most—more than I've ever been stretched. And so, I started there, I set an impossible goal to five times my income, and it seemed completely impossible. And then, in September of 2020, I achieved that. And it was very exciting, and I'm so excited to share with you how I did that after we go to the rest of our introduction. So, Dex, go ahead and introduce yourself.

Dex Randall:

Thanks, Jenn. My name is Dex Randall, and I'm a Scholars coach with The Life Coach School, and I also have my own coaching business as a burnout coach for professional men. And my impossible goal was actually not completely related to being in Scholars. I did come into Scholars, but when I had been in Scholars for about three months, and I'd been digging in on my personal relationship stuff, I got involved in a road accident, and my new impossible goal became to learn to walk again after being basically hit by a car.

Dex Randall:

And so, what happened for me is, I was cycling down to the beach one day, one Sunday morning, going for a swim, and a car suddenly came across the front of me. I had a couple of seconds before I T-boned the side of it. I smashed through his windscreen, and I went cartwheeling off down the road for about another 200 meters at very high speed. I smashed up my lower spine, my hips, my pelvis, my legs, my ankle, and one arm. So, for me, it was a bit of a shock, and as soon as I got into hospital, they told me, "Well, you're going to be here for 12 weeks, and for the first eight weeks, you're not going to be able to move at all out of your bed, or anything." And then, they said to me, "Well, it's probably going to be about a year before you can learn to walk properly again."

Dex Randall:

And to be honest, getting up that morning, that hadn't been in my plan. And when I'm listening to them, it was very hard to accept the news that they gave me. So, straightaway, because I had been in Scholars for a while I thought, "Well, OK, I'm not going to accept what they're saying." They're telling me one thing, and I decided otherwise. I decided my impossible goal would be to walk without crutches at week 13, which is one week after coming out of hospital.

Dex Randall:

And so, I booked a flight to visit my family in that week. I live in Australia and they live in UK, so it's a 24-hour flight. I knew it was going to be difficult, I knew it was going to be painful, but I completely committed, and I booked a flight to go and see them. So, I used all of the skills that I'd been learning for the three months I had been in Scholars—all my self coaching tools, to accelerate my recovery way beyond anything that the surgeon suggested was going to be possible for me. And I'm going to talk about how I did that in a couple of minutes.

Jenn Hatch:

Amazing. Thank you for sharing that story. OK, we'll go ahead and pass to IB.

IB:

OK. Hi. So, I think for me, I was already a Certified Coach with The Life Coach School when I joined Scholars, so I was familiar with the tools in The Life Coach School. And I had never ever dared myself to do anything that I considered to be impossible, because everything was possible in some way, shape, or form. And I had this dream, and I call it a dream, because it was pretty much a dream that maybe one day, I'll work for The Life Coach School as a coach full time, and I'll get to leave my full-time job. But it was really a dream, because who sets a goal to leave their job in that year and change their income, and that sort of thing? So, I didn't really see that that was even possible for me. It was more of like a one-day thing. Maybe one day I'll do this.

IB:

And then, I joined a similar call to this actually around this time last year, which was The Year of the Impossible, and I set a very loose, impossible goal that I pretty much did nothing about. And then, January came, February came, and I was like, "You know what..." I was in Tanzania—this is when we were actually able to go on holiday—and I decided to just reset, and I said, "You know what? I really want to commit to having a goal to leave my full- time job and become a coach with The Life Coach School, and work in my own coaching business." And I just went about believing it. And honestly, it wasn't easy, because you have all these thoughts that come into your head: "I'm not going to be able to do it. What if I don't get through? What if I'm not good enough? Because if I find out that I'm not good enough, and I don't get it, then what does that mean? Have I become a coach for nothing?" And you catastrophize, and all this stuff.

IB:

But actually, I realized that the biggest gift I could give myself was just having my own back each and every step of the way. And that's something that I'm going to speak a bit more about. If you're willing to make mistakes, you're willing to fail, and have your own back each and every step of the way, then there's pretty much nothing that you can't do. And actually, in less than a year, I became a coach in Scholars, and I coach the most incredible human beings within Scholars, and it's my dream, it's my calling.

Jenn Hatch:

Love it. Thank you for sharing that as well. Carola, [crosstalk 00:07:40].

Carola Fuertes:

Hi, everyone, my name is Carola Fuertes, I am Chilean, I live in Chile, and I joined Scholars in April of 2017. I had taken a sabbatical year from my corporate job, and I was taking time to spend with my children who were 1 and 3 at the time. And at the end of that sabbatical year, I realized that I didn't want to go back to working full time for a company, and I wanted to find a way to make it work—to replace that income with something that I really, really, enjoyed doing. And that's when I started considering also going through Certification. So, I joined Scholars in April, and later that year, I got certified, so that was the end of 2018. And 2019, I started working as a coach for Self Coaching Scholars.

Carola Fuertes:

And this year, probably midyear, I achieved that goal of replacing my income, my corporate income, which was a very comfortable income, with working as a coach. I coach for Scholars. Also, I have my own practice where I coach in Spanish. And I love sharing this because I know there are many Scholars—I've coached them—that their language, their native tongue, is not English, and they get all caught up in that, and they are wondering if this is going to be useful for them, if they're going to be able to take advantage of that. And I promise you that, if there is a will, there is a way, and you are completely capable of achieving anything that you want, and this is what we are all going to teach you about.

Jenn Hatch:

Amazing. Thank you. So many good stories, I hope that all of you listening are getting inspired and getting excited about the goals that you've set for yourself. For anybody who's joined late, I just wanted to remind you that we are bringing anybody live on this call, so anybody with raised hands, but you can use the Q&A box to type in any questions and we'll be answering as many of those at the end of the call as we have time [inaudible 00:10:02]. So go ahead, and you can start typing your questions in at any time. One of the things that I love to teach when I think about impossible goal work, and one of the things that I really used in my own life when I was working towards my impossible goals was the small steps.

Jenn Hatch:

So, when I looked at my impossible goal, when I set my impossible goal last year to five times my income, I immediately thought that I had to make five times my income right then. The next month, that's when I had to achieve that goal. But when I took a step back and just decided, "I don't need to know how that's going to happen, I don't need to do the math of what I need to do every month to make that achievable. I just need to do what I know next, the next best step in getting to that goal, what feels believable to me now that I can start taking action towards." So, that was one of the big things that I did. Just "What can I do today that gets me to my goal, and what can I do consistently?"

Jenn Hatch:

I also like to think about being willing to be uncomfortable. So, that is something that I really embraced. And a lot of times, we talk at The Life Coach School, that discomfort is the currency to our dreams. But I realized that being uncomfortable in and of itself doesn't necessarily create my dreams. What really creates my dreams is that I want to have discomfort in achieving that result. So, just being uncomfortable doesn't get me anywhere. But if I'm uncomfortable, and I get a result from being uncomfortable, then I'm going to get closer to my goal. So, think about that in your own lives. What is it that you're uncomfortable with right now? And if you move towards that discomfort, are you going to create a result that gets you closer to your goal?

Jenn Hatch:

So, I think about... For example, the very first time I taught a webinar, I was filled with fear, and that is an emotion that I'm not comfortable with. But when I moved towards fear and taught the class anyway, that was a result that I was creating that moved me towards my goal. Just feeling fear in itself doesn't necessarily move me towards my goal. So, think about, how can you create and move towards your discomfort, but also create a result that moves you towards your goal? I'll go ahead and pass it to Dex. And I think you're muted, Dex.

Dex Randall:

Let's unmute.

Jenn Hatch:

There we go. Yes. Thank you.

Dex Randall:

Thanks, Jenn. All right. So, just to recap my impossible goal, it's maybe a little bit different from other people's. I spent 12 weeks in hospital recovering from being hit by a car. I lost the use of both legs and one arm, and my goal was to learn to walk again without crutches one week after I left hospital, so I could visit my family in the UK. And what I want to share with you today is a little bit different. I'm going to share the 10 steps that I followed to get me to my impossible goal, because some of those may apply to you, whatever your goal is. So, the first one, is I cleared the decks. Step #1: Clear the decks. I had to make peace with what is, I had to clear any negative thinking from my mind, because negative thinking was going to block me from my goal.

Dex Randall:

And so, #1 thing is, as soon as I'd had the accident, I immediately knew I had to forgive the driver who had hit me, because it wasn't in his plan to hit me, he didn't get up in the morning wanting somebody to come through his windscreen. It was a complete accident. He wasn't to blame. And if I blamed him, I was going to be in victim mode, and from victim mode, I wasn't going to be able to achieve my goal. So, I forgave him on the spot, and I let that go. The other thing that I needed to let go of was, I was in the last two weeks of a kinesiology diploma when the accident happened, and I was going to start... in fact, I had already started a new business around this. And I immediately could see that I wasn't going to be able to finish the diploma.

Dex Randall:

It was like the loss of a big dream for me, it was my impossible goal before. And so, I really had to mourn that immediately and just let it go immediately. So, that dream was also not blocking my recovery. So, I think it's very important just to clear all that negative thinking before anything else. And my Step #2 then was to set myself the impossible goal, which was to visit my family at week 13. It was going to be a 24-hour flight to get there. It was going to be very difficult and painful, I thought, for me, but nonetheless, I committed. Because six months before, I'd had a heart attack and I had been in rehab from that for a really long time, and my family were really dying to see me, and I was dying to see them, so I just bought the ticket. I committed, I decided that was what I was going to do. No plan B, really.

Dex Randall:

And so, Step #3 was being told "no." When people tell you "no," they tell you, you can't do something. That's not a fact, it's just an opinion, it's just their thought about something. And I decided that I had a different thought. Actually, right from the beginning, I visualized myself being able to walk on the beach again, and in fact, I'm a runner, and I visualized myself being able to run on the beach, even though they told me I would never run again. I just didn't let that one in, really. And I lived in the future self, the future me, who'd already made a full recovery, and he was already able to do those things. I rehearsed every day me being able to do that.

Dex Randall:

So, in order to get there, Step #4 is, I took massive action. I disciplined my mind to do every little thing... A bit like Jenn said, every little thing that would move me towards my goal. And I was in a lot of pain. I was having difficulty moving, but I did everything that the staff and the surgeons told me to do to recover. And they told me to do bed exercises lying in my bed, which was very difficult to do. They said, "Do 300 of these, 200 of those, three times a day." And I just did it. I didn't have to feel like it. I didn't have to want to do it. I didn't have to be comfortable. Everything they said to do, I just did it. And I really reminded myself of my why. When I was in pain, and I was miserable, I just remembered what I was trying to achieve, and that this would take me forward to it.

Dex Randall:

So, step #4, really then, is finding positive evidence that I was moving towards my impossible goal. Because the brain is always looking for negative evidence. It's always looking for what might go wrong, what has gone wrong, what is wrong. And so, I looked intentionally for the positive evidence of what was going right. And on bad days, when I felt really hurt, and broken, and hopeless, I just rested my mind a little bit, and the next day, I just picked up and started again. And I never lost faith that it was all going to work out in the end. And importantly as well, I think, is I look for the learning in the experience I was having. It seemed adverse. I thought, well, there must be some meaning in this, there must be some reason I'm going through this.

Dex Randall:

And to help me along the way also, Step #6—I set a second goal, which is... in week two, when I was in hospital, from lying in my hospital bed, I had a prearranged interview for Coaching Certification at The Life Coach School. I thought I'm going to still run with this. Because at 16 weeks, they said, "Well, there's a Live Coaching course happening in Dallas," and I decided I would still go. Because I had lost my kinesiology dream, and it was a big one, and I needed something else to latch on to. So, I just went ahead. And I set a third goal actually. I decided I was going to buy myself a new pushbike at six months, because my old one got written off in the accident. And having those kind of subgoals helped me to get to my big goal, I think.

Dex Randall:

And so, Step #7 was, I accepted support. I decided that the learning for me in this experience... I was like a naked broken animal by the side of the road. I was raw. I was vulnerable. I was completely and utterly helpless. So, I needed to accept some support from other people. And my friends, God bless them, came and visited me most days in the hospital. And they brought me coffee, and they brought me laughs, and they brought me vitality, and it was really amazing for me, and I realized I didn't need to do my impossible goal by myself. And previously, my [inaudible 00:19:03] was to fix my own problems, so it was quite a big leap for me.

Dex Randall:

So, Step #8 is being in gratitude for what is. In the first couple of weeks in hospital, I was surrounded by men in worse trouble than I was. Most of them had had heart disease or heart attack, a lot of them had comorbidities like diabetes. Two of the guys in there had to have leg amputations because of diabetes. And it was very easy for me to sit in gratitude every day. And when we're in gratitude, it stimulates these happy hormones in us. It's very good for the mind, and it's very good for the body healing as well.

Dex Randall:

So, Step #9 was retaining a positive mindset on purpose. After a couple of weeks, they moved me to a bed by the window in this ward, and I could look out onto the park below, and I could stay connected with nature and stay connected with the outside world, with real life still going on, and that was really helpful to me. And I also maintain my spiritual life. I fully believe that the universe had a very good plan for me somewhere in here, and that, therefore, it was going to support me to get there.

Dex Randall:

And Step #10, which I think is one of the most important, I remained in future focus. I thought every day about seeing my family and how that was going to be, and I could see the looks on their faces. And I planned a lot for the future and what I was going to be able to do in the coming year. And I never really dwelt on the things that I could no longer do. Even though that could have been very painful for me, I really tried not to go there. So, when I took those 10 steps... And I really hope some of those apply to you, whatever your impossible goal is, because those motivating factors, and recognizing success is so important. And looking back on it now, I did visit my family at week 13 without crutches, and it was epic. It was wonderful, and I wouldn't have missed it for anything.

Dex Randall:

And I did go through Coach Certification in Dallas at week 16, and I did buy a new bike at six months, even though I was completely unable to sit on it, let alone ride it. And really, I think the crowning glory is, last week... I mean, the accident is two and a half years ago now, but last week, my medical insurance company came and made a little documentary clip about me as an example of what's possible, to inspire other people towards their own recovery. They said I would never run again, but this morning, I went down to the beach and I ran 11K. So, whatever you think is impossible, really ask yourself again if that's actually true, because for me, it never really has been.

Jenn Hatch:

Amazing. Thank you, Dex. I love some of those things, and I know as you guys are typing in questions, a lot of what he shared will be how we answer some of these. So, thank you for sharing, that was so incredible. IB, do you want to go ahead and share your tools with us?

IB:

Yeah, sure. It was so great hearing from Dex. I've got goosebumps, but OK. So, with me, for what I shared, was that my impossible goal was to be able to leave my full-time job, that I was absolutely smashing, to become a life coach full time in my own practice, and within the Self Coaching Scholars program specifically. And what I wanted to kind of speak about was just to flip a word that is almost like a dirty word, which is failure, and failing, and look at that in terms of failing well. Because as you move towards your impossible goal, being willing to fail is something that can actually yield dividends for you, right? And as human beings generally, we don't want to fail, right? We just want to do everything perfectly. We want to get it all right.

IB:

But when you look back in your life, I'm sure there have been experiences where you have experienced failure, and maybe you've even learned from that, right? There's a quote that I love that Brooke Castillo says, which is, "Fail for the sake of learning how to fail and learning from that failure." And that, for me, has probably been the biggest most important lesson I have learned as I've worked towards my impossible goal. So, what does failing well look like? Right? It looks like... I remember putting myself forward, sending a video across as part of my interview process, and getting some feedback. And the thing is, the feedback was actually fine, but I would pick on all the little things that didn't go my way, that didn't look like this glowing report, and just say all these kinds of things to myself, like, "I knew I shouldn't have done it. I knew I wasn't ready yet."

IB:

And part of the practice was catching myself doing that and saying, "OK, IB, when you go into beating yourself up and seeing all the things that you did wrong, how is that making you feel?" It was making me feel defeated. And when you feel defeated, the last thing that you want to do is keep working towards your impossible goal. And here's another thing that I learned, is, "What if I was willing to feel defeated knowing that this is part of the journey?"Jenn said something about being willing to feel discomfort for the sake of the journey. So, I'm willing to feel defeated knowing that the only reason I feel defeated is because I put myself in a position where I could even fail, right? And those are the steps that I'm taking towards my impossible goal.

IB:

And it's having your own back every step of the way. OK, maybe you did make a mistake, maybe you didn't say that thing the way that you wanted to say it. Maybe you didn't do the things that you wanted to do. Are you willing to have your own back and say, "It's OK, I get to support myself in this, I get to have my own back?" Because if you're willing to have your own back no matter what, then you're going to keep going. You're not going to be able to give up on yourself, because you're always going to be there for yourself. And that's a huge lesson I learned on this journey, is to always have my own back.

IB:

What's another example of failing well? It's being willing to feel all those emotions, embrace the suck. It's not always going to feel good, right? Sometimes you're going to feel horrible. You're going to feel like things aren't going right. It's not always going to feel good. But what if those emotions were just an indication of what you're thinking? "OK, what am I thinking right now that's making me feel this way? What's coming up for me?" Maybe I'm doubting myself, maybe I'm not seeing what's possible, that's a reminder for me to focus on my why. "Why am I even doing this?" Right? "For the possibility that I could actually be one of those people that gets to live my dream at the end of this year. I get to be one of those people that says, "I love my job." How incredible would that be?"

IB:

I never used to be that, and I never saw myself as one of those people. It's always somebody else out there that gets to say, "I love my job." OK. Get back on the horse, keep trying again. I'm willing to feel defeated. I'm willing to feel not enough, right? So that I can do this. And I want you to think of a time... is there a time that you have learned from failure? Right? Is failure always a dirty word for you? Or can you actually flip it and see, "Oh, there was this time I was willing to fail, maybe I actually did fail, what did I learn from that?" What did it teach you? If you're always in that energy of curiosity and being willing to learn from your failures, then failure doesn't have to be this ugly thing that always holds you back. You fall down, you get back up. You fall down, you get back up. That's the drill. That's the joy of being human, is that we get to learn from our mistakes.

IB:

And here's the thing, you're going to make them. What if you just went into this knowing that "I'm going to make mistakes, but if I'm committed to learning from my mistakes, there's nothing that's going to bring me down; there's nothing that's going to throw me off course." Feel your emotions, embrace the suck, right? And one thing that really stands out to me is... The worst thing that can happen are those emotions that we spoke about, That's literally the worst thing, right? If you feel defeated, that's the worst thing that you're going to experience, is that feeling. If you can hold yourself through that, feel those feelings, then you become the kind of person who doesn't have to stop because of their emotions. And then, you just get to take the small steps that Jenn and Dex mentioned, small steps towards your goal. [inaudible 00:27:55] Like we said, you fall down, you get back up.

IB:

Break it down, allow it to be easy for you. Your brain is going to want to complicate it, and make it feel like it's really hard, but we already knew that it was an impossible goal to begin with, right? It starts off as an impossible goal. We know it's going to be impossible, but, "What if?" Your brain is going to say, "But what if not?" But what if it could happen? You're always kind of coaching and self coaching yourself through it. Your brain is going to want to freak out. That's what brains do. And you bring it back, and you say, "This is what could be possible. This is what could be possible." And you keep having your own back. And I just guarantee you, friends, that if you always have your own back, then you'll never, ever, ever going to go astray.

Jenn Hatch:

So good. And that reminds me of not using the impossible goal against yourself. This is for you. That's what you were telling us. When you set an impossible goal, you use it for yourself, not to beat yourself up, not another reason to beat yourself up. Thank you for sharing. Carola.

Carola Fuertes:

There, can you hear me? Gosh, I'm learning so much from my colleagues. This is great. So, I am going to share six tips with you that I use. This is one of my favorite topics to teach here in Scholars, so I'm going to share with you what I share normally with Scholars. If you join, you're going to learn so much more, but these are the best six that I brought here for you. So, #1, is commit to believing in the possibility of your goal. Often, your brain will want to go to probability, and when it does that, it's not going to like what it finds. But if instead of doing that, you focus on possibility, even 1% of probability could be enough for you for your goal to come true.

Carola Fuertes:

So, that's #1. Regardless of the time, how possible are you willing to believe that your goal is? And I mention time because that is one of the things that our brains like to do. We like to give ourselves a lot of time. So, let's say that my goal is to make $100k in a year. So, if I think of December next year, it might be easier for me to believe that it's possible. But if I break it down to what I would have to make monthly to make that goal, it's about $8,300, then all of a sudden, the brain doesn't want to accept that. If it's far in the future, it's easier for the brain to accept that it's possible, but the closer you bring it, the harder it is for your brain to accept that belief. And that is one of the things that we teach you inside Scholars—how to believe new things. It's such an important skill to have in life. And nobody teaches us that. We should be taught that in school, if you ask me, but we got you.

Carola Fuertes:

So, we will teach you how to believe things that you don't yet believe. That's so important when you are looking into making your impossible goal happen. So, #2, is connecting with the feeling that you expect to experience once you achieve your goal. So, how do you imagine you are going to feel when you have that goal already in your life? So, if it's the $100k, if it's replacing your income, like it was mine, if it is getting hired by The Life Coach School, if it's walking again, like Dex was telling us. He was visualizing that. How do you think you're going to feel is so important, because when you are able to create those feelings now, that's going to drive you to create that goal so much faster. That is going to be your fuel to create that goal from an energy of abundance and of having done it.

Carola Fuertes:

So, #3, it's a bit counterintuitive, maybe. This is probably not what you have heard elsewhere, but it's action is not what create your results. It is your brain and your thoughts. So, when you come up with your impossible goal, you will come up with an action plan, and you will try that out. And most likely, as IB was telling us, you're going to fail. So, your brain will want to make that mean that it's never going to happen. But remember that actions don't create your results—it's your thoughts. So, in that case, you need to remember that if you keep believing in the possibility of your goal, you're going to change course, you're going to tweak, adjust, and you're going to take action again. So, when you rinse and repeat that, creating the outcome is going to be inevitable.

Carola Fuertes:

Tip #4 is don't be afraid to look at the objections that your brain is going to offer you. I remember that when I was pre-coaching, I was very scared of looking at the negative thoughts that my brain offered me. So, if my brain said things like, "Oh, that's never going to happen, or who do you think you are?" All of that, I was really afraid to even acknowledge that those thoughts were there. So, you might relate to that. I talk to people who say, "That's exactly what happens to me." We think that if we even say them out loud, somehow we're going to make them true, or something. It's like, we're going to give them power by acknowledging them. And the opposite is true. When you don't even want to look at them, you're making them more powerful because they are still in your mind creating results for you in your life.

Carola Fuertes:

So, really important is to let them out so that you can confront them, so you can ask for coaching on them, so you can question them and challenge them, and really decide if you want to believe those thoughts or not. When you can do that, it's so empowering. When you can say to your own brain... If your brain is telling you, for example, "Who do you think you are to set that goal?" And you answer like, "OK, I am a professional, or I am a human that has certain skills, and I am willing to feel the discomfort," as IB was telling us, "I think I can really do this." Then your brain is going to be like, "Maybe. So, maybe you're right."

Carola Fuertes:

So, tip #5, is remember that this is a process, and that you're going to have to iterate a few times before you actually create the outcome that you want to. And in this part, I think it's also important to keep in mind that the deadline is just a tool. So, often... In the example that I gave, I want to make $100k by the end of next year, the closer we come to the deadline, and if I am not making the progress that I thought I should have made by a certain date, let's say it's October and I'm at $50k, it's easy to start dropping the goal and to just give it up and forget about it, because we feel less comfortable believing that it's possible. But the deadline is just a tool. I am in business for the $100k, not for the date, December.

Carola Fuertes:

So, what if it takes me 15 months to make the $100k? It doesn't matter. I'll still take it. I will take the $100k three months later than just $50k and dropping it in October, right? I guess most of you will agree with me. So, remember that it's a process, and the deadline is not what you want. You want the result. OK?

Carola Fuertes:

And tip #6 is become the person that guarantees your own results. When you do that, then no goal is really impossible. And that's exactly what we teach you in Scholars. How to become that version of you who is willing to fail, who is able to connect with those feelings, and who regards this as a process, and never gives up until they reach their goal, even if it's not by the exact date that they expected it. That's what I have for you.

Jenn Hatch:

Amazing, that's so good. It's such an interesting concept, too, that I'd never heard before joining Scholars, that it really is our beliefs. It starts there. And we're going to be talking about that in the Q&A, too. So, I'm going to hand this first question to Dex. Elizabeth is asking, "How do you deal with your internal resistance and procrastination?"

Dex Randall:

That's a very good question. And I think one of the things we learn pretty early in Self Coaching Scholars is to motivate ourselves to achieve things. And really, if we're procrastinating, we're doing it to avoid a negative emotion usually. So, it's good to identify what it is you're trying to avoid by procrastinating. What's uncomfortable about taking the action that you need to take? And then, when we've identified that, we can sit with that. It's just a human emotion. And when we become comfortable with that emotion, then the procrastination becomes less necessary. And then, we can refocus back on our why. "Why do I want to achieve this? Why is it important for me to support myself?"

Jenn Hatch:

That's so good. OK, I'm going to go ahead and take this question. [Michael 00:38:33] is asking, "Increase my income five times, can you tell us real steps you did? My impossible goal is to earn money for Certification, and I have no idea, even small steps, how to do it." So, here's what I'm going to tell you. I had the goal to increase my income, and I had no idea either. One of the things that I did was ask myself an empowering question every day. So, instead of, "I have no idea how to do this," it was like, "What could I do? What's the next step?" And something that we teach at The Life Coach School that I have found so true in my life, is that we get money based on the value that we're giving to the world. And so, another question that I asked myself a lot was, "How can I create more value?"

Jenn Hatch:

I in fact had that on my phone as a reminder of a question that I wanted to ask myself daily. So, that reminder would come up on my phone, it would say, "How am I going to create more value today?" And then, I would let my brain come up with all the ideas. So, the thought that you have right now, "I have no idea how to start," is what will keep you stuck from achieving it, from moving forward, from taking the next small step. It really was small steps. Another thing that I did, that Dex talked about too, was I visualized myself getting there. I was really open to the Universe letting it happen, instead of being so tied to, "I don't think it will happen, I don't think this is possible, I have no idea how."

Jenn Hatch:

I opened up to visualizing myself having it happen. I visualized myself writing a very specific message to a specific person letting them know that I did it, and I thought that every single day. So, even on days when it didn't seem like I had my result yet, I still took the action. And that's what we talk about a lot about failing, not necessarily failing in your actions, but failing... Even if you don't have the result yet, you keep taking the actions. So, think about opening your mind to, "Maybe I do know some ways," and just start there, and then visualize yourself having achieved it.

Jenn Hatch:

So, the next question comes from Christie, and I'll pass this to IB. "I look forward to starting The Life Coach School in January. My goal is to quit my teaching career after this school year, how likely is it to find a career and life coaching position straight out of Certification?"

IB:

So, such a good question, because this is a really great example of believing, right, is, how likely is it? You get to decide that, right? There isn't something outside of you that determines how likely it is. If that's something that you would want to do, it would be a brilliant example for you to set as your impossible goal, right? You can set it now and decide, "OK, this is something that I want to do. What do I need to be thinking now to be able to create this? What do I need to be feeling? What do I need to be doing?" It is so, so possible. As you've heard from me, you've heard from Carola, you've heard from Dex, and Jenn, it is so possible, right? What do you already have? What are going to be the steps that you're going to need to take to get there?

IB:

And you can start jotting these down. "OK, here's what I need to do. Maybe it's that I need to research where I want to take my Certification. Maybe I need to save the money." When you start to put all these things together, you can get to work on believing that it's possible, visualizing that it is possible for you, right? I want to be a life coach. Here's how I see myself being a life coach. And then, when your brain throws up all the reasons why it might not work, you can respond to that, here's why it will work, and here's what I'm choosing to believe, just because I can. You really just get to tell yourself, "This is what I want, and it's going to happen."

IB:

And you can actually tell yourself like, "It's as likely as I want it to be. It's as good as done." Right? If you just tell yourself that... And it sounds ridiculous. "I just told myself it's as good as done," but that's a start. When you tell yourself "It's as good as done," how do you feel?Right? And how will that drive your behavior as you go forward?

Jenn Hatch:

Yes, thank you for sharing, so good. OK. I'm going to pass this, Anonymous is asking, "I often fall into the trap of having my own back by allowing myself to slack off on long hours, or audacious goals. For example, letting myself sleep longer after a very hard work day. How can I begin to change this?" I'll have Carola take that one.

Carola Fuertes:

OK. So, this is a very good question, because most of us, we'll do, sometimes, what we call buffering, which is anything that we do to avoid feeling anything that's uncomfortable for us. So, when you say that you allow yourself to slack off, it's probably that you are trying to avoid feeling a certain way, and you're doing what we call buffering, which could take different forms. In your case, it could be watching TV. Some people do it with eating, or drinking, overspending. There are many ways that we try to avoid feeling emotions that are not comfortable for us.

Carola Fuertes:

So, I would get really curious about what is the feeling that you're trying to avoid by buffering?" And also, when you say that you're having your own back by doing that, I have a question that that is true. How is doing that actually not having your own back? How would actually, following your plan, or going after your goal and your dreams, that could be more having your own back than actually allowing yourself to buffer.

Jenn Hatch:

Yes, that's so good. Thank you. OK. Amy asks, I'll pass this on to Dex, "Do you have to set one goal at a time, or can you reach two goals at the same time? For example, run my own successful business and earn five times my salary?"

Dex Randall:

Another good question. What we do recommend is focusing on one thing at once, because then you give it your maximum amount of brainpower and energy, and everything that you do is aimed towards getting that one goal. So, what you might want to do with your two goals is achieve the first one, and when you've completed that, then head on for the second one. Because this narrowness of focus, this constraint, is incredibly powerful. You've got a lot of energy, but when you point all that energy at one thing, you have a much greater chance of achieving it. And also, it gives you the feeling of success and momentum as you're going along, without getting the confusion of trying to pursue two aims at once.

Jenn Hatch:

Yes, thank you, Dex. And this kind of goes along with this next question a little bit, that I'll answer. [Danin 00:45:36] is asking, "An impossible goal for me at 75 would be to be a mental health life coach. I am also at the place of being diagnosed with early dementia. Is it an attainable goal, it seems a little crazy?" So, here's what I want to say to that. And the reason that I feel like it goes along with what Dex was saying is because the reason for goals is really the growth and the journey that we get from them. So, if you think about your goal right now, there's so much uncertainty, but we do know that we can have so much growth in the journey towards it.

Jenn Hatch:

And when we choose one goal, we're choosing to work on that for the journey and then we're not in a rush. We don't have to achieve the goal because we're going to be some sort of better version of a human being. We're not going to have more value when we get there. And so, choosing to work on one goal at a time, or one goal that seems a little crazy, which is what impossible goals are, we do that because of the growth that we're going to have on the journey to it. And so, there's no rush to it, and there's no need to knowing the how, or needing to be certain about anything. We go towards it because of what we create for ourselves in the growth and the journey of it, and not because we're going to be more valuable.

Jenn Hatch:

So, we can kind of drop the rush, we can kind of drop having too many goals at one time, because we're living into this future self and the growth that we're going to have. And the journey gets to be just as exciting as coming to that place. So, for everybody asking if there is going to be a replay, any steps that you've missed, we will be providing a replay. So, I wanted to let you guys know that. I'll pass this to IB. Valeria says, "When you were just beginning, how did you remind yourself to get curious, getting back to your why, and connecting to your future self?"

IB:

I love this question. How did I remind myself to get curious? I think, when you notice that you're going into all-or-nothing thinking. So maybe when you're saying, "It's either this way, or it's either that way," that can be an invitation to just open up, right? OK. How am I seeing this as black and white? What's in between? What could I be missing here? Right? Because it's like opening a window of opportunity, rather than just seeing as, OK, there's only this way that I can do this."

IB:

Another thing I like to kind of check with myself is how I'm feeling. "Am I feeling open, or am I feeling closed?" That can be such a useful question that you can use in any area of life. When you're feeling closed, you're generally not that open to the possibility compared to when you're feeling open, and seeing what's possible.

Jenn Hatch:

[inaudible 00:48:31] Thank you. OK. Carola, I'm going to pass this question to you. [Frozen 00:48:35] asks, "If nothing really excites you, does that mean you don't want anything bad enough?"

Carola Fuertes:

That's a good question. I think it's important for you to really question that. Is it really true that nothing really excites you? Or do you think it might be a defense mechanism of your brain to keep you safe? It's so important to remember that our brain's main objective is to protect us and to ensure our survival. So, often, the brain will try to use any trick it can to keep you from doing new things. Anything that is new is going to be perceived as a threat, and your brain doesn't like that. So, I would really be curious about that, and try to explore that question in a nonjudgmental way. So, often, we make something like that mean that there's something wrong with us. So, you could be thinking, "There's something wrong with me because nothing really excites me." But it might not be the case, it might be that your brain is just trying to protect you.

Carola Fuertes:

And I would ask myself, "What am I trying to avoid feeling? What am I afraid of? What do I think could happen if I give myself permission to want something?" Often, questions that are really outrageous like, "If you could have anything in the world happen, if you could make anything come true, what would that be?" When you put that in terms of almost like a magic wand, or like a genie in a bottle, that could help unleash those desires that you might have not given yourself permission to even acknowledge that are there.

Jenn Hatch:

Yes, that's so good. Thank you, Carola. OK. Dex, I'm going to pass this on to you. Mariana is asking, "Can you give a definition of a powerful visualization? How to make it appealing to myself?" And I feel like you had a really good one. So, this would be a great question for you to answer.

Dex Randall:

Yeah, thank you for that one. And I think visualization is very powerful. So, what I did in my case, and what you can do, whatever your goal is, is visualize yourself, or imagine, if that's easier for you, the future you who's already achieved. And really go into the detail, really like watching a movie of who you are in that moment, and how you're behaving, and who's around you, and what clothes you're wearing. Really make it as vivid as you possibly can in your imagination, or your visualization. And feel the pleasure of being in that place and having achieved this impossible goal, and what it means to you to have taken that journey. And really connect with the positive emotion that you're in having got to that place. And when you can connect with that, you can replay that little movie of yourself every day, and it will automatically draw you towards it.

Jenn Hatch:

Thank you. Yes. So good. I love getting very specific, I think that makes it powerful. OK. So, I'll take this question. Angela is asking, "How do you deal with shame around your goal? For example, the exposure of a new you out there?" And this for sure happened for me. I had a lot of thoughts about money that I had to clean up before I could even make a money goal. And I was afraid to tell people, I had a lot of shame about setting a financial goal, and I had to clean up a lot of that. Because shame is only coming from what I'm thinking. So, nobody out there is going to create shame around your goal. No matter what anybody else says, they can't make you feel shame for your goal. It's going to be what you're thinking about your goal.

Jenn Hatch:

So, kind of go in and explore, what is the thought that you're having that's creating shame? And why are you feeling shame? What is the shame that's coming when you think about your new you? Why does that create shame? What are you afraid of from other people?And kind of start exploring that, because that's where all your power is. What other people think... There always going to be people who have thoughts about you, and what they think can't create your emotion. So, as long as you're working on what you want to believe about you, what you want to believe about the new you, and your goal, that's where you have all the power, and that's where you're going to be able to do the work, because you'll never be able to control anybody else anyway. OK, let's talk to... I'm going to pass this on to IB. Anonymous is asking, "What do you recommend to create powerful routines?"

IB:

All right. What do I recommend to create powerful routines? So, in Scholars, there's a tool, a resource called Monday Hour One, which you'll find out loads more about when you join Scholars. But one thing that I found really useful was using Monday Hour One. And how I use that, for example, is being able to take the time to actually just get everything out of my brain that I need to do. Get it out of your brain and onto paper. And it doesn't matter, you don't have to censor it and say, "OK, I must do all these things." What you're doing is just getting it out of your brain and onto that piece of paper. And then, you can then look at those tasks and decide, "OK, how am I going to schedule these in my week?" Right? And so, that's something that I use.

IB:

And one of the things that's really great is being able to schedule out your free time. Because a lot of the time, you worry about being too stringent. "Am I going to be able to have time to do the things that I want to do?" So, you can ask yourself, "OK, what do I actually value the most in my day, in my week?" Schedule out that time, protect that time, so it's protected for you to be able to use. And then, go ahead and schedule out the rest of your week. What could that look like? What do you want to be doing? And allocate the time, and just stick to that time. You might wonder, "How long is it going to take me?" It takes as long as you decide. That's something that you just get to own. "I'm going to decide that this is going to take me 30 minutes and work towards it."

IB:

And remember, this isn't a strict thing, you get to set it, so you get to decide what these tools are that you're going to do, and how you're going to do that within the time frame that you've set yourself. And then, what might then happen is, when it comes to actually doing the task, you might not feel like doing it. That's OK, that's normal if you don't feel like doing it, it's on your calendar, and you get to give yourself the gift of just following through. This is how you start following the routine.

IB:

But remember, that it's a routine that you set, you don't have to do it, you chose it, and you just get to follow through. You'll notice that I'm saying things like "get to." That's a really useful way of how I like to approach it is "I get to do this. No one's forcing me, I don't have to. I get to do this because this is what's going to serve me on this journey to my impossible goal."

Jenn Hatch:

Thank you. OK. I think we have time for one more question that I'll pass to Carola. Anonymous is asking, "How can I stop worrying what other people have to say and create content and put it out in the world? I have so much fear."

Carola Fuertes:

I love this question, because it's certainly something that we all deal with. And one thing that's important to understand is that fear is normal, it's just a human emotion. It doesn't mean anything other than you are a normal human being. But often, because nobody teaches us about emotions, we make it mean that it's a sign that we need to stop, or that it's a sign that we're in danger. And certainly, the brain interprets that as such, but that doesn't mean that it is really something that's threatening you in actuality. So, that is one thing to consider first. And the second is that, usually, we are afraid of what others will think of us, right? And what's important to acknowledge is that most of the times, we will never know. I would say, we will never, ever know. Even when we think that we know because somebody does say something, that's still what they're saying, which is not necessarily the truth.

Carola Fuertes:

So, one of the things that we teach you in Scholars is how to allow other people to have their own thoughts about you, and you be OK with that. We call that giving others permission to be wrong about you. When you give them permission to think whatever they want about you, and you have your own back with what you want to believe about you, then the fear, even though it's normal, it tends to fade, and it tends to be less intense.

Jenn Hatch:

Yes, thank you so much. That's so good. So, I just wanted to end the call, there were a couple of questions about the difference between Scholars and Certification. Our Scholars program is if you want to receive coaching, and our Certification Program is if you want to become a Certified Life Coach. So, all of us on this call have done both, we've done both Scholars and have become Certified Life Coaches. If you just want coaching, you can join Scholars, and we have so many resources in there for you. There's so many questions we didn't get to today, but if you join Scholars, you'll get private coaching sessions. That is one of the things for sure that I feel like took me to my next level and my impossible goal, getting coached by these people on this call, and so many of our other Scholars' coaches, as well as written coaching.

Jenn Hatch:

So, you have access 24/7 to type in a question, and a coach will answer it for you. And we also have group classes. So, we have classes every weekday where you can join and get coached, and watch other people get coached, and ask questions, and take all of this goal setting to the next level. So, we're so excited that you joined us today. Thank you for being on the call. And we hope to see you in Scholars. Bye.

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